Kanche Kroonk


Mt. Ararat When the Green Doors of Spring Open

Spring is a young, pretty girl dressed in green clothes, with a maiden’s red shoes and yellow apron, and with a blue scarf upon her head. Wherever her foot touches, a flower grows amongst the greenery. Beneath her gaze, dry branches come to life. And whomever spring smiles upon, love blossoms in his heart. . . . and with love comes longing, expectation. . . .

Our soul also blossoms; it blossoms and fills with song. Each of our longings and our expectations have a song. Let us be happy or sad, at home or somewhere far away; let there be snow, rain, or sun; it is all the same. Our soul longs for spring. And every desire, longing, and dream takes form, becoming a flowering apricot branch, a newly opened bud of a snow flower, a rose’s maddening fragrance, and a song. . . . a song . . . and yet another song. . . .

Often, a song takes wing and flies from country to country, sea to sea, and soul to soul. . . .

I would like to present one of Armenia’s most-loved folk songs. This version of “Kanche Kroonk” was transcribed and arranged by the great Komitas. For the Armenian people, the crane is a revered bird. Tradition says that killing a crane is a great sin. When one takes aim with his rifle, the crane turns at once into a village bride, with a newborn child in her arms.


Kanche Kroonk

Call, crane, call, it is spring;
This wanderer’s heart has turned to blood.

        Dear crane, it is spring,
        Ah, my heart has turned to blood.
        Dear crane, it is spring,
        Ah, my heart has turned to blood.

Call, crane, call, the fields are green;
The world is full of sun, my heart full of longing.

        Dear crane, the fields are green,
        Dear crane, the fields are green,
        Ah, my heart is full of longing.

Call, crane, call, the sun is shining;
When autumn comes, go to my land, give greetings to my love.

        Dear crane, the sun is shining,
        Dear crane, the sun is shining,
        Ah, give greetings to my love.


This piece originally appeared in Armenian in the March/April 1999 issue of
Aghpyur Children’s Journal.

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